What I thought being in an AMWF relationship would be like vs reality

When I first started dating my boyfriend I thought that him being from a different country¬†would be amazing, interesting and I would get to learn a lot, but I also thought that because he was Asian, his culture and his family life might be too different from mine for me to cope. In reality, you can’t know how a relationship will turn out.

Here are some of the things I thought would happen in our relationship vs the reality:

1. He would whisk me away to lots of new and exotic Asian countries.

Reality – His parents invited me to Hong Kong, all expenses paid, when they went a few weeks after we got together. My boyfriend didn’t even bother asking me and told them I would hate it because it was too hot. And he was probably right. (We did go to Hong Kong the Christmas after and it was amazing but I don’t think we can afford that again any time soon.)

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2. Asian people place a lot of value on family and have big, extended families. I would have to meet them all and be judged by them.

Reality – I’ve only met his Mum, Dad, brother and cousin. His parents like me and his brother and cousin are pretty much like him (but slightly more into Asian culture) He won’t let me meet the rest – clearly embarrassed of me! ūüėČ

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3. He would love Asian culture and he could introduce me to lots of new, awesome things!

Reality – By Asian culture, my head was thinking of Japanese culture – I thought he would be really into anime and manga. While he does watch anime from time to time (we’re currently re-watching the original Pokemon series together) but other than that he isn’t into anime culture. He even told me he thinks Studio Ghibli films aren’t very good! (I almost dumped him at that comment) He has cosplayed with me a couple of times, but I think that was him just being nice…

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4. He would teach me Cantonese.

Reality – Cantonese is DAMN HARD, especially for someone like me who is useless at languages. Not only that, he can’t remember half of it any more, nor can he remember how to write it.

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5. People would comment and look at us because AMWF relationships aren’t common.

Reality – People DO look at us and comment, but it’s rare. A lot of the looks tend to be from Asian guys and the comments seem to be from ignorant, young, chavy white people. I hope we’re getting to a point where interracial relationships are 100% normal.

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I prefer reality. I do hate the hot weather, I hate social situations, I have to be in the right mood to be interested in anime, I’m too lazy to learn a new language and I certainly don’t want people looking at us! It’s just a normal relationship and I like being normal.

What did you think it would be like being in an interracial relationship and was it different to reality?

All images via Google Images – labeled for reuse

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Whampoa and the Avenue of Stars

After a great morning at Lantau Island, we took the MTR to Hong Kong Station, then a mini bus (bit scary) to Whampoa, where my boyfriend used to live. We took this opportunity to buy phone cards just in case we lost each other. They are around 50 HKD each and have 50 HKD credit on them so they’re definitely worth buying if you visit in case of emergencies. We checked out some of the shops and had lunch; my lunch was from McDonald’s (I haven’t had a McDonald’s since Hong Kong and I don’t think I want to have another, really made me hate them) and my boyfriend had some meat and rice from Maxim’s, a Chinese fast food place. The only plus side of McDonald’s was the cute toys you get with the Happy Meals!¬†We then went to Hong Kong Toys R Us and Wonderland, where I bought some things including a Totoro toy and a really cute rabbit money box for just 9 HKD (Around 75p)

P1150084Whampoa

We then went to see where my boyfriend used to live. It was a flat close to all the shops and really cramped in with other flats. A lot of Hong Kong is very cramped but I never realised the extent. The windows of one set of flats were just metres from the window of the flats next door – if I lived there, i’d never want to open the curtains or the people across would be able to see in! It made me realise just how small and populated Hong Kong really is. He pointed out his exact flat, which was very high up. I’m not sure there are many flats in the UK that would go up that high.

P1150089The block of flats where my boyfriend used to live

Once we were finished in Whampoa, we took the ferry to North Point. I didn’t have my travel sickness pills with me so I felt a bit unwell, but luckily it was just a short journey and I managed to take some nice photos of the HK skyline. We dumped our things at the hotel before taking the MTR to Causeway Bay.

P1150105The view from the ferry

Causeway bay was very busy. For some reason it was filled with big Lego statues. The reason we had headed to Causeway Bay was because my boyfriend knew there was a shop here called “I love rabbits”…and I really do love rabbits! Sadly we couldn’t find it and think it may have closed down or moved, so we headed back onto the MTR to Tsim Sha Tsui (which I learnt how to pronounce correctly…but have now forgot)

Tsim Sha Tsui is the home of the Avenue of Stars, an Asian version of the Hollywood Walk of Fame, located on the Victoria Harbour waterfront. We knew that at 8pm, they would have a Symphony of Lights show that we really wanted to see. The buildings on the other side of the water lit up or had lasers coming out from the roof, all in time with the music. Sadly, I think all the Christmas lights didn’t help the show, it made it a bit hard to see in places, but it was still fun to watch.

P1150126Watching the Symphony of Lights show

We then walked up the Avenue of Stars and found Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan’s stars, the only two people I had heard of! Sadly I hadn’t realised just how awesome Jackie Chan was at this point (I have realised it now!). I definitely need to watch more Hong Kong films so that I will recognise more of the names next time I visit.

P1150142Bruce Lee’s Star at the Avenue of Stars

We finished the day with a trip to Harbour City shopping centre, browsing the shops and eating a pretty amazing brownie and cream crepe. We also found more gashapons! We then headed back to the hotel as we were pretty tired…and I was starting to feel a bit unwell…

More posts on my adventures in Hong Kong here:

Day One: My first trip to Hong Kong

Day Two: Lantau Island

Day Two: Whampoa and the Avenue of Stars

Day Three: Hong Kong Disneyland

Lantau Island

We woke up early today to head to the Ngong Ping 360 cable cars and the Tian Tan Buddah on Lantau Island. My boyfriend struggled to speak Cantonese to the woman selling the tickets, so she ended up talking in English to us. I think my boyfriend was just a bit rusty, because he seemed to do a lot better later in the holiday. He got 10% off the ticket for being a Hong Kong citizen (bit jealous). There were two types of cable cars we could have taken; a crystal cabin with a see through floor or a standard cabin. The waiting time for a crystal cabin was 40 minutes, so we decided to go on the standard one (next time we’ll go on the crystal one!)

P1140926Our view from the cable car

It took about 20 minutes on the cable car to get to the top. We went over the sea and a huge forest on the hillside. We also got a good view of the airport. Half way up, you could see the huge Buddha that we were heading towards in the distance, really showing it’s size! There were lots of shops when we reached the top which we walked through on the way to the Buddha. It really felt like traditional China which is something I really wanted to see coming to Hong Kong. It’s interesting to see this side of the Hong Kong culture, even if it is still very touristy.

P1140959Walking through the shops towards the Buddha

P1140947The Tian Tan Buddha

P1140962The entrance to the Buddha

I’m not sure if we’re just very unfit but the walk up the steep stairs to the Big Buddha was a lot of effort. We had to keep stopping and pretending to take photos to have a break! It was a fairly warm day which made the climb even harder. Apparently there are 240 steps. Once we reached the top we got an amazing view of the Buddha, it really was huge! Apparently it can even be seen from Macau on a clear day. There was also an amazing view of the mountains, which really reminded me of Japanese landscapes in old paintings. Underneath the Buddha was was a room full of name plates of people, I assume Buddhists, who had died.

P1140980Climbing the steps

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Statues presenting offerings to the Buddha

P1150003The mountain in the clouds

P1140990A close up of the Buddha

We headed back down. There were loads of stray dogs around (at least I assume they were stray) sleeping in the sun and begging for food. They were very cute but I felt sorry for them too. We then walked to the Po Lin Monastery which had lots more Buddha statues which I actually found a bit creepy. Lot’s of people were burning incense sticks, because they believe that the Gods consume the smoke. It’s a shame that they were doing building work on the monastery because it looked very spectacular, and very Chinese. We went back to the shops and had a look around, getting some ice cream on the way as it was so warm. We also found some Gashapon machines which we went a bit crazy over. I think by then end of the trip we had spent about ¬£20 on them, mostly buying little pokemon figures. We took the cable car back down and in the shop at the exit, my boyfriend bought me a cute little panda toy which I have named Buddha Panda. It’s basically a cuddly panda with a Chinese style shirt!

P1140963Stray dogs sunbathing

P1150037The Po Lin Monestery

P1150038A fantastic view

More posts on my adventures in Hong Kong here:

Day One: My first trip to Hong Kong

Day Two: Lantau Island

Day Two: Whampoa and the Avenue of Stars

Day Three: Hong Kong Disneyland

My first trip to Hong Kong

I’m going to write about my trip to Hong Kong. My boyfriend and I booked this trip just 2 months after we’d started going out. It was my first trip out of Europe so it was slightly scary (mostly because I wasn’t sure how well I’d cope on a 14 hour plane trip), but having someone from Hong Kong who could speak Cantonese certainly made me feel better.

P1140814Our journey on the plane

We went in December 2012, just before Christmas, because I’m not good with heat. I get sunburnt in the UK, so I would have no chance in Hong Kong in the summer.¬†We took the plane from Manchester Airport for my first ever long haul trip and I was pretty excited! My boyfriend found it hilarious that the air hostess spoke English to him, but German to me as she hadn’t realised we were together. He now likes to tell me i’m German all the time… (We flew on Lufthansa via Frankfurt so it was understandable – I could have been German!)

We’d left Frankfurt at 10.15pm so we slept on the plane at a normal bed time for us.¬†We hadn’t managed to sleep too much on the plane so we were a bit tired, therefore the time difference wasn’t too much of an issue for us. We arrived in Hong Kong at 4.10pm so we could just have a short first day.

P1140836View of Hong Kong from the plane

The heat was too much for me straight away. We took a bus to our hotel, an Ibis right next to the North Point MTR station, which took about 1 hr 10 minutes, giving me a chance to see Hong Kong for the first time. It was interesting to see that the hotel missed out a lot of floor numbers, which my boyfriend explained to me was due to Chinese superstitions. For example, in Cantonese, the number “4” sounds a lot like “death”.

P1140855Lots of British food in the supermarkets!

After checking in, we went to the Hong Kong supermarket “Park N Shop” which my boyfriend loved – all that Hong Kong food he can’t get back in the UK! It had a lot British food too so I was happy, even though it was a bit more expensive than normal. We had to stock up on lots of bottled water because the water in Hong Kong isn’t really drinkable. We also went to a very cool shop called “Wonderland” which is full of anime/manga things. One issue we had was that my boyfriend’s Hong Kong debit card kept being rejected because he completely forgot that the pin numbers are 6 digits, not 4 like in the UK! That caused us a lot of hassle, with him having to go to the bank to sort it out. We went back to our hotel for a snack before heading to the MTR.

P1140869My first real view of the streets of Hong Kong at mid-levels

My boyfriend gave me an Octopus card, a lot like London’s Oyster card, which made travel very easy. I was amazed at how cheap the transport was! We headed to Central where we went on the world’s longest escalator called Mid-Levels. It’s over 135 metres from top to bottom. I was expecting one massive escalator, which on reflection was a bit stupid of me, because it has lots of gaps so that people can get off. On the way, we found a pub called “Yorkshire Pudding” which made me laugh. (My boyfriend is from Yorkshire!)

P1140880The streets in Lan Kwai Fong

We then went to Lan Kwai Fong, a square of streets in Central which is very popular with tourists as it’s full of pubs, restaurants and clubs. We weren’t that hungry so we didn’t stop for any proper food, but we did get some Hagen Daz ice cream from their own shop – expensive but tasty! We headed back down the escalators and towards the International Finance Centre for a quick look. As we came to Hong Kong just 2 weeks before Christmas, there were lots of Christmas lights up on the massive buildings, which was very impressive to see. We then went back to our hotel for sleep. My first day of being in Hong Kong was over, and I was loving it already!

P1140894Christmas lights near our hotel

More posts on my adventures in Hong Kong here:

Day One: My first trip to Hong Kong

Day Two: Lantau Island

Day Two: Whampoa and the Avenue of Stars

Day Three: Hong Kong Disneyland

Going to University – West vs East

I had my graduation! It’s officially over now! I’m no longer a student! …I’m really going to miss it… ūüė¶¬†University changed me for the better, not because of my course, but because of the experiences of moving away, living by myself and meeting new people.

Education is clearly rather different in the West and the East. Focusing on Hong Kong and the UK, the pressure in Hong Kong to do well is far greater than in the UK. Children do many more exams and from an earlier age. According to my boyfriend, children are ranked in their classes from best to worst (I couldn’t disagree with this more) and some primary schools want to see how clever the child is before they let them attend.

I want to talk about the ideas and attitudes that British and Hong Kong people have when going to any university in general, but maybe other countries will fit into what I am saying. I have no experience of the education system in Hong Kong. I can only talk about what friends have told me.

Here are 3 stories from my boyfriend (Hong Kong born but lives in the UK), myself (lived in the UK all my life) and my friend (Moved from Hong Kong a few months ago to attend university in the UK) about the decisions when it comes to the last part of education; university.

Story 1

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My boyfriend was living in the UK when it was time to choose a university, and he applied to the 2 in his home town. His parents didn’t go with him to open days or look at the universities. All they did was tell him which course he was allowed to do, not considering the fact he may not enjoy it, not want to do it as a career and most of all, he may be quite bad at it! He wanted to study Business or ICT. They chose for him Accounting and refused to sign guarantor papers for the fees and his rent unless he did what they said. My boyfriend has told me it is because they thought it “sounded better”. He had some huge arguments with his parents about moving into halls of residence. They didn’t want him to go because they lived a bus ride from the university he got into. Money saving was more important than the experiences you can gain from university.¬†I admit for many people there is nothing they can do but save money. With the rising costs of university, people aren’t being able to leave home. But my boyfriend had the money to do it and he wanted to do it.

Story 2

union-jackMy parents expected me to go to university like they did, and that was fine because I expected myself to go too. It just felt like something you do, in the same way you progress through school. I always knew what course I wanted to take, a subject I loved, and my parents were more than happy for me to take whatever I wanted. They took days off work and drove me to various universities all over the country. They helped me decide on the pros and cons of each university, the city or town it was in, the location and the course. They gave me advice, but not once did they tell me where they wanted me to go. They didn’t want to influence that decision because it was mine to make, even though I’m hopeless at decision making! I think I picked the university they thought was the best for me anyway. They also supported me financially by paying for my fees, so that I would only have to cover rent and food and I wouldn’t have to take out a loan. I know I’m lucky, because a lot of parents couldn’t afford to shell out ¬£3,000 a year.

Story 3

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My good friend recently moved from Hong Kong to the UK. She really wanted to move here and is currently studying at university. However, she had also applied for a course at a Hong Kong University. While she didn’t want to stay in HK, she was convinced that the course in would mean better job prospects because it was a slightly more highly regarded university. While this may be true in Hong Kong (I don’t know for sure), in the UK this isn’t such a big issue.¬†Oxbridge may initially look appealing to employers, a 1st degree at a middle of the range uni is far better than a 3rd at Oxford, and probably easier to achieve. She was then extremely upset when she didn’t get into the Hong Kong university, or her first choice of course (this is understandable) and is planning on doing this degree, then applying for a different degree once she has finished, then doing further higher education courses afterwards. Now she is here in the UK, I think she has lightened up a bit, but she still seems desperate to be better than everyone else.

In my opinion…

…of course you want to get a good degree, you don’t want to waste all the money spent to come away with nothing to show for it, and you want to get a good job eventually, but university is so much more than working. It’s about learning to be independent, buying your own food, cleaning for yourself, socialising with new and different people, managing your own time and money, experiencing a new place, discovering yourself, and most of all having fun! You will have a life time of working ahead of you. You might as well have some fun while you can. University should be the best 3 years of your life.

What are your thoughts? What do you think is the most important reason for going to university? 

I’m back! (with Moon cake!)

I am back from a trip to my boyfriend’s parents house. I didn’t see much of them – we were quite busy seeing friends from Hong Kong. We went ice skating, bowling, to the cinema, to the park, to the shopping centre and high street shops, to a Chinese buffet, to several restaurants and to cake shops. I’m so tired now! I also managed to practise my Cantonese with them. (I kept saying Chest Cat…more on that later)

While I was there, I tried some moon cake.¬†This is basically very delayed, as you’ve all blogged about moon cakes already, but it was my first time trying it so I feel the need to post! My boyfriend stocked up on lots of Chinese noodles from the Chinese supermarket, as we have no idea where one is near where we are living now, and while we were there we saw the moon cakes being sold off and he decided to buy one for me to try.

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Can anyone tell me what the characters on the moon cake and packaging mean?

It looks so pretty…but me being me, I didn’t like it. I can see why people do like it though. The lotus seed paste wasn’t as horrific as I’d first though. It tasted quite nutty. The egg yolk inside it however was pretty nasty. You don’t need that! After a few bites, I decided I’d had enough and my boyfriend downed the whole thing in about 2 bites.

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My friend from Hong Kong told me that the Haagen Dazs shops do a chocolate ice cream version of a moon cake…I want one! Though I guess I’ll never get one if it means having to go to Hong Kong in September – I couldn’t stand the weather! So that’s another piece of Chinese cuisine I don’t like. I’ll keep searching for something I do like though and you’ll definitely all know about it when I find it!

Anyway, just a short post.¬†Lots of you want the rest of the story of how I met my boyfriend. I’ll get to writing that and post it over the next week. Stay tuned!

How I met my boyfriend

This is the story of how I met my boyfriend. Not how I got together with my boyfriend – how I met him and how we became friends, way before he became my boyfriend.

I had just arrived at my halls of residence. I knew that the next day my parents were going to leave me in this place, 250 miles away from my home, where I knew no one at all, and I was pretty scared! As we moved some of my things into my room, an Asian guy appeared in the corridor and my Mum started the conversation for me as I am shy and awkward.

My Mum: Hi, do you live here?

My boyfriend: Err, no, I live in the room here. *Points to the room next door*

(That’s what she meant!)

We introduced each other, shook hands (we’re British!) and he told me if there was anything I needed, to ask him. That was it for day one. I knew nothing about him except his name. I assumed he was a Chinese international student because of his accent. Little did I know his accent wasn’t as Chinese as it could be. I’d never spoken to a Chinese person before so I had no idea.

I’d chatted to some of my other flat mates, but mostly I just stayed in my room. I decided I needed to take the opportunity to chat to someone, so a couple of days later when I saw him coming out of his room, I said…

Me: Hey, I was just going down the shops, I wondered if you wanted to come?

My boyfriend: Oh..err…I can’t. I have to go to university. Maybe another time though.

Me: Oh, ok, see you later then.

And I walked off to the shop, feeling rejected. Normally at this point I would give up, I’m really that lazy when it comes to being sociable. However, I managed to chat with him a few times in the kitchen over the rest of the week.¬†He offered to take me around the city, as he had lived here for 9 years at this point and I had no clue where anything was. He gave me a mini tour of the city while I talked non-stop and he just nodded occasionally. It was at this point I found out he wasn’t a Chinese international student, he had lived here for a while and he actually knew English quite well. He took my phone number just in case of emergency, like getting locked out of the flat. (Something he had already done several times)

I was going through a really bad time in my life when I started university. In the second week, my Mum came up to visit me and give me some bad news in person. While I was crying in the hotel, he text me. I told him what had happened and he text back saying sorry…he didn’t seem overly sorry but at least he hadn’t made a horrible joke like I know some people would have. He then asked for my MSN address so we could talk a bit more.

From that moment on we talked on MSN for ages, even though we were living next door to each other. It was easier for us both to have long conversations on MSN, then message “Going to the kitchen now, want to come?” and have a chat in there while we cooked. I found out an actor I liked was at the theatre in my city, so I invited him to come with me to “stalk” the actor after the play ended. He agreed to come along, and I think that moment revealed just how truly mental I am…and he accepted me for it. We sat outside the theatre eating fish and chips, and he took photos for me as the actor left out of the stage door. That was the start of a beautiful friendship.

Soon after, he sent me an MSN message asking me out. I said no…but that’s a story for another time. ūüėÄ

English names in Hong Kong

Sticking with the subject of names after my post about how I think¬†my boyfriend’s name may be affecting his ability to get a job interview, I’ve been thinking about the English names people from Hong Kong give to their children. People in Hong Kong generally have a Chinese and an English name, due to the fact Hong Kong used to be owned by the UK. The reason that this has interested me is because of¬†how strange some of the names are.

My boyfriend has a pretty uncommon name. I think it’s more popular in America, but i’ve never heard of anyone with his name in the UK. His brother and his parents have extremely old fashioned names, to the point where I am sure only 90 year olds would be called the same.¬†It’s also common to find people with names you would never hear in the UK (unless the baby belonged to a celebrity); things like Angel, Apple, Coco and Bunny (and these are some of the more normal ones!)

You only have to look at some Hong Kong celebrities to see the strange names they come up with. (I don’t know who most of these people are or why they are famous, i’ve just been googling names)

There are old fashioned names such as:

  • Ada Choi
  • Winston Chu
  • Herman Li
  • Josephine Koo
  • Stanley Kwan
  • Raymond Kwok
  • Walter Kwok
  • Betty Loh
  • Kenneth Tsang
  • Elsie Leung
  • Albert Chan
  • Neville Poy

There are also names that are random words such as:

  • Fruit Chan (Food)
  • Hilton Cheong-Leen (Hotel)
  • York Chow (UK City)
  • Butterfly Hu (Insect)
  • Athena Chu (Goddess)
  • King Hu (Nobility)
  • Ringo Lam Leng-tung (Member of the Beatles)
  • Hacken Lee (Football team)
  • Gigi Leung (Film)
  • Race Wong (Sporting event)
  • Run Run Shaw (Action)
  • Teddy Wong (Cuddly toy)
  • Griffin Yue Feng (Mythical Creature)
  • Ekin Cheng (River)
  • Oxide Pang Chun (Chemical Compound)

…and of course…

  • Jet Li (Aeroplane)

3 (1)Jet may be an uncommon name, but it definitely makes him sound tougher.

It’s not just the celebrities making up names. You can see some more interesting names in¬†this blog post¬†by HK Girl Talk.¬†The people of Hong Kong are not crazy though! There are reasons that they give their children names like these.

One reason is that the people of Hong Kong want to be unique. It’s very unlikely you would find more than one person in the world called “Steel Tong” and for them, this is a good thing. It’s also much more memorable than “Dave Smith” and in this competitive country, you need to stand out. In the UK however, a name like this probably wouldn’t have a positive effect.

Another reason is that some people do not 100% understand English names. In Hong Kong, Chinese names have a meaning – for¬†example the name “Li Yong” means brave, so they may think that naming their child “Pretty” or “Strong” is a normal think, though of course it isn’t. It’s just a cultural difference that doesn’t translate. This also can refer to the old fashioned names – it’s not surprising that people in Hong Kong might not know which English names are currently popular.

I’ve always disliked strange names. I don’t think you should force something like that on a child. I can only see it as a selfish act and it can make their lives very hard! This is coming from a UK point of view though. A child in the UK would get horrifically bullied if they were called “Fish”, but maybe that wouldn’t happen in Hong Kong and maybe it really will help them get further in life when they are older. Not everyone has an odd name, but it is the norm rather than a rarity. If the reason for the strange names is because the parents don’t understand how English names work, however, I think that’s kind of endearing. (I still feel very sorry for the children though!)

What are your thoughts? Do you know any Asians with an “interesting” English name?

Reasons why I shouldn’t be dating an Asian

There are a number of reasons why I shouldn’t be dating an Asian man. Here are a few of those reasons.

Chinese Buffet

Food heaven for some, food hell for me

1. I hate Chinese food. In fact I hate most food but I can’t cope with the texture of most of the meat in Chinese cuisine, or taste of the sauces. This also means my boyfriend’s Mum thinks I’m a bit strange and quite unhealthy.

2. I think you should live your own life, not your parents. I’m not saying this is true with every Asian family but my boyfriend’s parents decide a lot of things for him, including which University degree he took, and I find that very hard to deal with. My parents would never dream of being so controlling and honestly, listening to my boyfriend having to argue with his parents to be allowed to do every little thing when he is 21 years old winds me up.

3. I’m generally not very understanding of other cultures.¬†I just can’t help but thinking the Western/UK way is the way to go (even when it might not be).¬†I know I should open my mind up more to these things…but if Chinese medicine worked, it would just be called medicine.

4. I can’t speak Cantonese. His parents can’t speak English, I can’t speak Cantonese; It’s fairly hard to communicate. I can barely remember any of the 5 years of French I did at school and I remember absolutely hating learning it and not understanding anything I was saying or writing. If I can’t learn a language similar to English, I’m sure I’ll have no chance with something that involves different characters and changing the tone of your voice. I might manage the odd words and phrases but never a proper conversation. (Luckily my boyfriend considers English his first language)

5. I can’t cope with the fact he can’t speak fluent English. I know. I’m a horrible person. I expect him to speak perfect English when I can’t speak a word of Cantonese (Hey, we are in England and I didn’t even know Cantonese was a language until about 2 years ago). Every time he gets the tenses wrong or forgets to pluralise a word, I feel the need to correct him and he hates me for it.

Hong Kong Duck

I wish I’d been in Hong Kong when the duck was there…

However, there are also reasons why I should be dating an Asian.

1. I love Japanese things. Ok, my boyfriend is from Hong Kong, but he still grew up with anime films instead of Disney. My interests in manga and anime films means we have something in common. I’m not crazy obsessed like a few people I know, though I definitely had an obsession with Pokemon when I was younger, and I certainly didn’t choose an Asian boyfriend he looks like the Japanese do, but I was very happy when I was lent my boyfriend’s brother’s entire collection of the Love Hina manga.

2. I don’t have the same expectations as many Asians do.¬†I’m not saying that all Asian women only date men who are rich and successful, but my boyfriend is under the impression that a lot of them have very high expectations and are rather controlling. I’m sure this isn’t the case, but I am aware of the pressure that people can be put under in some Asian countries. I don’t want my boyfriend to be a high flying, rich business man, all I ask is that he isn’t too lazy to not get a job at all. As long as he is happy in life, i’m happy.

3. I’m interested in his culture. At my school, everyone (and I really mean everyone) was white British. At college, I noticed a few people of other ethnicities but not many. University, where I met my boyfriend, was a different story. I don’t think I had ever spoken to a Chinese person before meeting my boyfriend. I’ve learn so much about other cultures – you find out a lot more first hand than you can from anywhere else.

4. I get to go to Hong Kong. I would never have been there without him and I was able to experience an amazing place I had little idea about. He was pretty pleased (and maybe a bit surprised) that I wanted to go with him and let him show me around the city he was born and spent his childhood. He was especially pleased I let him fill the suitcase with Asian snacks.

5. I don’t care that he is Asian. In fact, I don’t care too much about anything I have written here! Ethnicity doesn’t make a person – personality does. I never wanted an Asian boyfriend (I never really wanted a boyfriend), but I fell for my best friend and that would have happened regardless of his ethnicity.

Images: flickr.com/photos/samsmith, flickr.com/photos/zanthia/